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I, Daniel Blake (The Criterion Collection)(Blu-ray)(Region A)

I Daniel Blake (The Criterion Collection)(2016) Blu-ray
 
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I, Daniel Blake Blu-ray
Criterion | 2016 | 100 min | Rated R | Jan 16, 2018

Video
Codec: MPEG-4 AVC
Resolution: 1080p
Aspect ratio: 1.85:1
Original aspect ratio: 1.85:1

Audio
English: DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1

Discs
Blu-ray Disc
Single disc (1 BD-50)
UPC 715515208918


I, Daniel Blake (The Criterion Collection)(2016) Blu-ray

Drama following a 59-year-old carpenter as he tries to navigate the British welfare system. In the North-East of England, widower Daniel Blake is forced to stop working when he is taken ill with heart disease and so applies for Employment and Support Allowance from the Government. But his life is further thrown into disarray when his benefits are suddenly taken away from him and he is forced to jump through the many hoops of the bureaucratic system to get them back. During this time, he meets the similarly-troubled single mother Katie, whose financial problems mean she is being forced out of her home in London along with her two children, Dylan and Daisy.

Director: Ken Loach
Writer: Paul Laverty
Starring: Dave Johns, Hayley Squires, Sharon Percy, Briana Shann, Dylan McKiernan, Natalie Ann Jamieson


Special Features and Technical Specs:
- NEW high-definition digital master, supervised by director Ken Loach, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray
- Audio commentary from 2016 featuring Loach and screenwriter Paul Laverty
- How to Make a Ken Loach Film, a 2016 documentary on the production of I, Daniel Blake, featuring interviews with Loach, Laverty, actors Dave Johns and Hayley Squires, director of photography Robbie Ryan, producer Rebecca O'Brien, and casting director Kahleen Crawford
- Versus: The Life and Films of Ken Loach, a 93-minute documentary from 2016, directed by Louise Osmond
- Deleted scenes
- Trailer
- PLUS: An essay by critic Girish Shambu

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